Forums: Climbing Information: Gear Heads:
UIAA falls
RSS FeedRSS Feeds for Gear Heads

Premier Sponsor:

 
First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All


seafood


Oct 8, 2004, 10:38 PM
Post #1 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jun 16, 2004
Posts: 13

UIAA falls
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

how big is a UIAA fall.

when a rope says it is rated to 6 UIAA falls. how big of a fall does it need to be to count... because you have small falls all the time.

i have heard that it is any fall over 20 feet, is this true?


curt


Oct 9, 2004, 12:40 AM
Post #2 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Aug 26, 2002
Posts: 18229

Re: UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

In reply to:
how big is a UIAA fall.

when a rope says it is rated to 6 UIAA falls. how big of a fall does it need to be to count... because you have small falls all the time.

i have heard that it is any fall over 20 feet, is this true?

UIAA falls are somewhat smaller than Niagara Falls. I hope this answers your question.

Curt


jammin


Oct 9, 2004, 12:42 AM
Post #3 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 20, 2003
Posts: 84

Re: UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

The number on the paper when you buy your rope is a unit of measurement.

For single ropes, an 80kg weight is attached to the rope which is then dropped to what amounts to a factor 2 fall (about a 5 meter distance). The rope must survive 12 falls with 5 minute rest periods between each fall. For double ropes the test is with a 55kg weight, per strand. There are other tests which the rope is subject to (sheath slippage, etc) This link should answer your question.

http://www.uiaa.ch/web.test/visual/Safety/UIAA101Pictorial.pdf


curt


Oct 9, 2004, 12:47 AM
Post #4 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Aug 26, 2002
Posts: 18229

Re: UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

In reply to:
The number on the paper when you buy your rope is a unit of measurement.

For single ropes, an 80kg weight is attached to the rope which is then dropped to what amounts to a factor 2 fall (about a 5 meter distance). The rope must survive 12 falls with 5 minute rest periods between each fall. For double ropes the test is with a 55kg weight, per strand. There are other tests which the rope is subject to (sheath slippage, etc) This link should answer your question.

http://www.uiaa.ch/web.test/visual/Safety/UIAA101Pictorial.pdf

Standard UIAA falls are not fall factor 2 falls.

Curt


jammin


Oct 9, 2004, 1:06 AM
Post #5 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 20, 2003
Posts: 84

Re: UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Yup, your right curt. Misread the image on the link.


hugepedro


Oct 9, 2004, 1:08 AM
Post #6 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 28, 2002
Posts: 2875

Re: UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Just a suggestions, jammin, dude, if you don't know the answer, don't go searching the web for the answer and posting like you know what you're talking about.

Is it just me, or is this site REALLY going downhill fast?


overlord


Oct 9, 2004, 1:26 AM
Post #7 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 14120

Re: UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

the uiaa fall is 1.8 (or 1.81) factor fall of an 80kg weight on 5m for single and 10m for double ropes over a 2mm (not sure if thats the exact number, but i think it is) rounded edge.

the fall is repeated with no rests until the rope breaks.


popol


Oct 9, 2004, 5:00 AM
Post #8 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Nov 9, 2003
Posts: 390

Re: UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

It's a 5mm radius edge (relates to the edge of a biner).

A rope must hold at least 5 drops without breaking. A rope that holds 10 or more standard falls, is allowed to be called a multi-drop rope. The 12 drops with 5 minutes rest mentioned above by jammin are bullshit.

By the way, the UIAA standard about drops on a sharp edge (0.75mm) has been suspended as of july 2004 till further notice.


kindasleepy


Oct 9, 2004, 8:30 AM
Post #9 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Nov 18, 2003
Posts: 51

Re: UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

In practicle terms...a UIAA fall is a HARD fall. If you take a 20 foot fall and have 80 feet of rope out, it is well below one UIAA fall. You will feel the dynamics of the rope soften your fall.

Yet if you take a 10 foot fall directly onto your belay anchor (ie 5 feet of rope), not only will you have taken 1 UIAA fall but you will also be trying to pop your vertebrae back into place. It will jar the h@ll out of you.

Use common sence, if you are worried about the number of big falls you have taken on your rope, you should retire it. A 100 bucks ain't worth your life.


jimdavis


Oct 9, 2004, 9:16 PM
Post #10 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 1, 2003
Posts: 1935

Re: UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

A UIAA fall is a fall with a factor 1.7 fall. That mean's falling past your anchor. It's a hard-ass fall that'll hurt a lot.

It's basically like placing a piece low, right above your anchor, climbing up 7 to 10 feet past it and falling. You'll fall a distance greater than the amount of rope you have out.

Any UIAA single rope holds atleast 6 of these falls. If you start taking falls like that though, I doubt you'll be taking 6 of them in a row, unless your REALLY stubborn and feel like getting a kidney transplant.

If you take a big whipper, let your rope sit for a while before you keep climbing on it. After your done climbing feel your way through the rope, if it still feels good, it's probably just fine.

Hope that helps,
Jim


jimdavis


Oct 9, 2004, 9:17 PM
Post #11 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 1, 2003
Posts: 1935

Re: UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

It's also done with a steel weight rather than a climber, so the test is a lot harsher than it would be with a live climber.


alpnclmbr1


Oct 9, 2004, 9:39 PM
Post #12 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Dec 9, 2002
Posts: 3060

Re: UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

In reply to:
Standard UIAA falls are not fall factor 2 falls.

For all intents and purposes, the UIAA 1.78 FF test drop is a FF2 fall.

In reply to:
The rope must survive 12 falls with 5 minute rest periods between each fall.

That figure is for a twin rope.


maldaly


Oct 9, 2004, 9:41 PM
Post #13 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Oct 31, 2002
Posts: 1207

Re: UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

The key factor (NPI) in a UIAA fall is that the fall is almost twice the distance of the amount of rope out. If you fall 10 feet on 5 feet of rope that would be a factor2 fall. A UIAA fall is slightly less because the rope passes through an orfice in a steel plate (to simulate a carabiner) resulting in a factor of 1.8 something. It's a brutal fall that tends to break gear and bones.
Mal


curt


Oct 9, 2004, 10:32 PM
Post #14 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Aug 26, 2002
Posts: 18229

Re: UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

In reply to:
In reply to:
Standard UIAA falls are not fall factor 2 falls.

For all intents and purposes, the UIAA 1.78 FF test drop is a FF2 fall.

I guess if you think 1.78 = 2.00, you're right.

Curt


leinosaur


Oct 9, 2004, 11:10 PM
Post #15 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Oct 6, 2003
Posts: 690

Re: UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

In reply to:
In reply to:
The number on the paper when you buy your rope is a unit of measurement.

For single ropes, an 80kg weight is attached to the rope which is then dropped to what amounts to a factor 2 fall (about a 5 meter distance). The rope must survive 12 falls with 5 minute rest periods between each fall. For double ropes the test is with a 55kg weight, per strand. There are other tests which the rope is subject to (sheath slippage, etc) This link should answer your question.

http://www.uiaa.ch/web.test/visual/Safety/UIAA101Pictorial.pdf

Standard UIAA falls are not fall factor 2 falls.

Curt

So what is it, Curt?


curt


Oct 10, 2004, 12:54 AM
Post #16 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Aug 26, 2002
Posts: 18229

Re: UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

In reply to:
In reply to:
In reply to:
The number on the paper when you buy your rope is a unit of measurement.

For single ropes, an 80kg weight is attached to the rope which is then dropped to what amounts to a factor 2 fall (about a 5 meter distance). The rope must survive 12 falls with 5 minute rest periods between each fall. For double ropes the test is with a 55kg weight, per strand. There are other tests which the rope is subject to (sheath slippage, etc) This link should answer your question.

http://www.uiaa.ch/web.test/visual/Safety/UIAA101Pictorial.pdf

Standard UIAA falls are not fall factor 2 falls.

Curt

So what is it, Curt?

Had you actually read this thread, you would have seen that the correct answer was already given.

Curt


chriss


Oct 10, 2004, 10:05 AM
Post #17 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jul 13, 2004
Posts: 92

Re: UIAA test fall? [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

Please take the time to do some research on this question. And consider the source of the answers you get. After a quick glance at the responces to this question. The FF is ~1.78, but there is more to it than that. The test has different limits for each class of rope.


chris


alpnclmbr1


Oct 10, 2004, 11:02 AM
Post #18 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Dec 9, 2002
Posts: 3060

Re: UIAA test fall? [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

At one time, I tried to make a distinction between a FF1.78 fall and a true FF2 fall.

Rgold informed me that for all intents and purposes, (math wise included) there is not a significant difference between the two.


robmcc


Oct 10, 2004, 1:07 PM
Post #19 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Mar 31, 2003
Posts: 2176

Re: UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

In reply to:
Is it just me, or is this site REALLY going downhill fast?

The view's obscured by the handbasket we're all in. I have the same problem.

Seriously, though, it's about the same from my perspective. Since I've been here (not terribly long, I suppose) there's always been good and bad answers to both good and bad questions.

Rob


chriss


Oct 11, 2004, 3:22 PM
Post #20 of 43 (31658 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Jul 13, 2004
Posts: 92

Re: UIAA fall [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

http://www.thebmc.co.uk/safety/tech/articles/issue20_ropes.pdf

This site has the best description I have seen. Be sure to look at the other requirements for UIAA approval.


chris


splish


Jul 21, 2012, 5:00 PM
Post #21 of 43 (17484 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Aug 21, 2005
Posts: 140

Re: [seafood] UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (2 ratings)  
Can't Post

Honestly. I would not worry about UIAA Falls too much. In sport climbing, bolts are set up much to close to hit the big fall factors. And in Trad, if you are hitting those factors, you really shouldn't be climbing.
The more important number is the Impact Force, especially if you climb Trad. You want the lowest impact force you can find. Bomber placements aren't always bomber as you think if your rope doesn't help out.


USnavy


Jul 21, 2012, 6:52 PM
Post #22 of 43 (17450 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Nov 5, 2007
Posts: 2660

Re: [overlord] UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

overlord wrote:
the fall is repeated with no rests until the rope breaks.

They do get rests. I believe they let the rope chill for five minutes in between drops.


(This post was edited by USnavy on Jul 21, 2012, 6:52 PM)


herites


Jul 22, 2012, 1:55 AM
Post #23 of 43 (17385 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Apr 10, 2011
Posts: 210

Re: [jammin] UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

1,87 ff, 80kg static weight in a drop tower, tested until failure, must be 5+ to get UIAA approval for singles


jae8908


Jul 22, 2012, 10:58 AM
Post #24 of 43 (17339 views)
Shortcut

Registered: May 15, 2011
Posts: 270

Re: [herites] UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (1 rating)  
Can't Post

are UIAA tests for ropes still performed exactly the same as they were 8 years ago?


acorneau


Jul 22, 2012, 2:36 PM
Post #25 of 43 (17311 views)
Shortcut

Registered: Feb 6, 2008
Posts: 2889

Re: [jae8908] UIAA falls [In reply to]
Report this Post
Average: avg_1 avg_2 avg_3 avg_4 avg_5 (0 ratings)  
Can't Post

jae8908 wrote:
are UIAA tests for ropes still performed exactly the same as they were 8 years ago?


Nice!

First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All

Forums : Climbing Information : Gear Heads

 


Search for (options)

Log In:

Username:
Password: Remember me:

Go Register
Go Lost Password?



Follow us on Twiter Become a Fan on Facebook