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Motivation
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naw


Dec 29, 2004, 5:58 PM
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Motivation
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Arno's principle for motivation has had me somewhat troubled since I read it and I was curious if anybody else ever considered it. Does anyone ever feel like their motivation for climbing may not be 100% pure...like it's tainted? Sometimes I feel like I'm more concerned with wanting other people to think I'm an awesome climber than actually enjoying the climbing itself. I feel jealous if I'm in the gym with other climbers who I feel like don't have as much experience as I have, but they're climbing harder, sometimes to the point where I'm concentrating more on their performance than I am my own. Part of it stems from the fact that I'm a competitive person, but I'm trying to bring myself to a more love-based motivation and enjoy the act of climbing and learning in itself.


wa_hoo


Dec 29, 2004, 6:39 PM
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Re: Motivation [In reply to]
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I think this is part of the work to be done on the RWW path. I think it's tainted for many of us - trying to impress someone or prove something to someone or whatever.

I just try and focus on what I want from it each time I go. I want to learn and grow. Every time I identify something new I learned or can do that I couldn't do before. Even if it's just a move or a way to use a hold or some mental issue. That keeps my focus on my path, and away from others'.


jt512


Dec 30, 2004, 4:51 PM
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Re: Motivation [In reply to]
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The first process is to observe, so let's say while you're preparing to climb, you observe yourself thinking about how your performance will impress some girl. Ask yourself what effect that will have on your performance. Really, it's just a distraction, isn't it? A power leak/sink, which will detract from your focus and hence your performance. So, seeing that, center and refocus your attention on climbing. This will result in your best performance, and your best chance of impressing the girl -- assuming that's what they like these days, like I know.

-Jay


unabonger


Feb 18, 2005, 7:28 PM
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Re: Motivation [In reply to]
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That you've recognized and admitted this seeming flaw in your motivation is admirable. Don't be hard on yourself about it. I suspect most climbers have a least a small bit of the same feelings.

The idea that your worth is tied to another's effort is bigger than climbing, and probably affects other areas of your life. That's one of the wonderful things about climbing. It is a crucible that forces examination of all our weaknesses, not just that in our forearms.

Another book that may help you explore this is Nathanial Branden's "Seven Pillars of Self-Esteem".

One thing that may help you make steps toward a more inwardly directed view of your motivation is to realize that ultimately, no one else really gives a damn how you climb. Climbing at some particular level may have rewards, but if your ability isn't backed by sincerity, compassion, trustworthiness, and the like, then those rewards will be fleeting. My bet is that you understand this on a logical level, but some primal, unsatisfied need overcomes your logic in this matter.

Good partners whose loyalty and love for you don't depend on your ability can go a long way toward overcoming this attitude. And it is an eternal effort for most of us to achieve and remain in that state of grace where we want only the best for all those we encounter, regardless of how they compare to ourselves.

UB


dredsovrn


Mar 6, 2005, 7:45 AM
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Re: Motivation [In reply to]
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Slightly off your original point (climbing for the questionable reasons), but I sometimes find in the back of my mind that I really don't want to go climbing. Fear, boredom, anxiety, exhaustion. There are lot's of reasons sometimes. I am not sure this will help you, but I usually take at least a week off when I start feeling this way. Within in a week, I can't wait to get out climbing. I just have to step back from time to time.


naw


Mar 7, 2005, 4:44 PM
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Fortunately, I don't have to worry about getting burnt out from climbing too much. I work every other weekend so I can only go climbing outdoors once every two weeks anyway. I only get into the gym about twice per week also. For awhile I was climbing 2-3 days per week in the gym and at least one per week outdoors...I find that now that I'm more relaxed about the amount of time that I spend climbing I actually enjoy it more and have much more energy/strength than I used to. On a side note, I went out to Foster Falls this weekend in Tennessee and led a lot of 9's, a couple easy 10s, and a 5.10c (my previous hardest lead was a 5.10a). Hopefully I can keep up the motivation and confidence through the season.


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