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Reviews by mgoodro (71)

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Graphic Print Fresco Water Bottle - 29oz Average Rating = 1.00/5 Average Rating : 1.00/5

In: Gear: Training & Accessories: Water Bottles and Bags

Bottle 1 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2009-07-01


I tried this out looking for a tougher Nalgene replacement for climbing and mountaineering. The plastic collar on the lid came off one bottle rendering it useless, and the taste is not as good as other metal bottles. In my mind bad tasting water is not only unpleasant, but may be a sign of something you'd rather not drink in the water (paranoia - likely). The lack of durability and improved taste eliminate the two main reasons to go with a metal bottle. I'd recommend a Kleen Kanteen or Sigg. I prefer the KK for it's wider mouth, but Sigg bottles tend to be more durable, both bottle and lid.


Arete 9.7 (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.00/5 Average Rating : 4.00/5

In: Gear: Essential Equipment: Climbing Ropes: Dynamic Single Ropes

Arete 9.7 - New favorite rope 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2009-06-08


Tough feeling, smooth handling, tangle free rope. I bought this on clearance with middling expectations. I love my 70m Marathon Pro 10.2, but it tangles easily and its nice soft sheath is now thrashed. I like my Levatator 10.5, but at 50m it's often too short. The Arete is as light at the Levatator without feeling like a skinny rope. The only time I notice the thinness is on belay or rap, the rope feeds a little more smoothly and quickly than my other ropes. I recommend using it with an ATC XP or similar device that handles thinner ropes well. I've been using the Arete for about 6 months and it isn't yet showing signs of heavy wear, something I can't say for my other ropes. Other ropes I've used with a sheath this durable were all stiffer and more difficult to handle and tie in to, especially when new. I like the way the Arete handles, and knots have been easy to tie since day one. For the first time with a new rope I experienced no twisting or tangling on the first use (I have always flaked it out new ropes before using). While I would prefer a bi-pattern rope the midpoint is well marked and easy to find.

Pros:
Good handling
Tough sheath
Resists tangling
Midpoint clearly marked
Cons:
No bi-pattern
Thinness can be an issue in ATC or early Reversos


Neutrino Carabiner (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.21/5 Average Rating : 4.21/5

In: Gear: Essential Equipment: Carabiners: Non-Locking Carabiners: Wire Biners

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2006-05-10


Not the lightest, but they have a good shape, solid feel, and decent gate opening for the size - unlike some ultralights (Camp Nano). They snag significantly less than my Trango ultralights. The colors in the rack pack are nice for those who match cam colors for rack management. They rack beatifully and are fine for sport if you have relatively thin fingers.


Positron Straitjacket Quickdraw (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.90/5 Average Rating : 4.90/5

In: Gear: Essential Equipment: Carabiners: Quickdraws

Review 5 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-09-30


I bought these for the biners; it was cheaper at the time to buy 4 draws than 8 biners. These are now my favorite sport draws, I just wish I'd picked up the longer dogbones. The keylock is one of the greatest innovations in climbing technology. I love the rubber sleeve on the dogbone for holding the biner in place in use, but I hate it when I'm raiding my sport draws for the positrons to use with trad gear and draws. I just need to get more Positrons.


Reverso 3 Belay/Rappel Device (Manufacturer link) popular Average Rating = 4.38/5 Average Rating : 4.38/5

In: Gear: Essential Equipment: Belay Devices & Descenders

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-08-08


After a few months of use I'm very happy with my Reverso. On belay it feels about the same as an ATC, but is smoother when lowering. It is also a little smoother on rappel. Belaying a second is where this really earns its place. The autolocking is amazing, especially the ability to autolock on two ropes. Ascending works surprisingly well, as long as you have a way to un-weight the device. This is now my primary belay device. One minor complaint: this is a noisy piece of equipment when hanging (banging) on its metal keeper.


Freedom of the Hills (Manufacturer link) popular Average Rating = 5.00/5 Average Rating : 5.00/5

In: Gear: Media: Instructional Books

Review 5 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-07-05


REQUIRED READING! Consistently the best explanations and illustrations for beginning to advanced climbing technique. Easy to read, easy to understand, and worth reading cover to cover at least once. This book should be a permanent fixture and referred to regularly. I have the 7th ed.


Aliens popular Average Rating = 4.73/5 Average Rating : 4.73/5

In: Gear: Essential Equipment: Protection: Active

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-06-28


I recently picked up my first Aliens, Green thru Red. As with any new gear I was testing it out in a variety of placements in shallow and flared cracks, pockets, etc. The Aliens held in shallow cracks and pockets, even when bounced on, where I fully expected them to fail. Where possible I compared them to my power cams (which wouldn't fit in many of the placements). The Aliens held in many places where the power cam would pull when weighted. Additionally, I was able to get solid placements in pockets to shallow or uneven for a tri-cam. My only complaint is the floppy cable in the larger sizes.


Positron Straight Anodized Carabiner (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.27/5 Average Rating : 4.27/5

In: Gear: Essential Equipment: Carabiners: Non-Locking Carabiners: Straight Gates and Regular D's

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-06-22


This is the only key-lock biner I've used so I can't compare it to the Dynotron or Spirit on anything but price (cheaper!). I picked up a my first five to use with wired pro, previously I was using Trango lightweight and BD wiregate Ds. The smooth gate and no-snag opening are worth the (slight) extra weight. I would prefer an oval for racking, but the advantages of the key-lock make up for the smaller basket and corner-pocket design of a D. The narrow profile is also a plus. I will definately be adding more of these to my rack for both pro and draws.


Grip Saver Plus popular Average Rating = 3.67/5 Average Rating : 3.67/5

In: Gear: Training & Accessories: Training

Review 3 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-06-14


I've got mixed feelings about this one. I am a fan of grip strengtheners; I keep one (the BD donut) in my car for the commute and use this one at work.

Pros:
- This is the only tool I've seen that targets the opposing muscles.
- It seems to work the those muscles well

Cons:
- The squeeze action on this one is pretty weak as it is just a foam ball.
- The finger grips are rather tight, especially on the thumb. I have thin fingers and am using the larger size.
- The finger pieces need to be removed one at a time to avoid a twisted mess (easily straightened).
- The price is high for what you get.


Ultralight TCU Set - sizes 00 to 4 (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.00/5 Average Rating : 4.00/5

In: Gear: Essential Equipment: Protection: Active

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-10


Active pro starter kit, includes the incredibly small micro-cam sizes 0 and 00. These are super light, the entire set weighs less than 500g. Sizes 00-1 do not include the range-finder feature, they're too small for the markings.


Uinta Rock Average Rating = 4.00/5 Average Rating : 4.00/5

In: Gear: Archive

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-09


Sooner or later someone was bound to publish a climbing guide for the Uinta mountains. I have to give props, the layout of the book is great with excellent photos (instead of topos) showing the routes. This book covers most of the major areas that are easily accessible from the Mirror Lake Highway (SR 150). There are many more amazing crags, not covered, further off the beaten path. This book is by far the best place to start.


Ranger Finder 4-Cam Set (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.00/5 Average Rating : 4.00/5

In: Gear: Essential Equipment: Protection: Active

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-09


Excellent camming devices. I prefer the twin cable design to the single cable release, it feels more natural, but that's all personal preference. As a set this is a great way to blow an REI dividend or Discover Cash Back Bonus. With a 20% off coupon these are nearly 30% off individual price. The bonus bottle of lube is a nice touch, but it would be nice to get a bottle of their cam cleaner as well. While we're wishing, I'd like to see a set with sizes 3-6 for doubling up on the more common units, as well as a set that includes sizes above 8.


Stopper Set 1-13 (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 5.00/5 Average Rating : 5.00/5

In: Gear: Essential Equipment: Protection: Passive: Nuts and Stoppers

Review 5 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-09


This is an excellent way to pick up a set of the de facto standard for passive pro. These are excellent stoppers strung out on a very decent racking biner. Buying a set is a great way to apply a discount, say a 20% coupon at REI, which can bring the price down from $7-8 each to around $6.


OvalWire Carabiner (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.41/5 Average Rating : 4.41/5

In: Gear: Essential Equipment: Carabiners: Non-Locking Carabiners: Ovals

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-09


Good for racking or as a spare biner. I prefer the lighter, easier to spot, similarly shaped Omega Pacific wiregate doval for most racking and pro placement, and the significantly lighter Trango lightweight wiregate for draws. This one has an edge in size for holding more stoppers, has a wider opening, and is large enough to use in a makeshift belay device, something you'd be hard pressed to do with tiny lightweight biners.


Rock Climbing the Wasatch Range (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.75/5 Average Rating : 4.75/5

In: Gear: Archive

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-09


This is THE guide for climbing in the Salt Lake Area. There is so much quality rock in these canyons that no guide can do it justice, but this book will give you a to-do list several years long. Each area has a map, most have a photo of the area, and almost all have detailed topos. The copy I share has been through some serious abuse and is holding up very well. My only complaint is the lack of topos for all areas (though coverage is very good), plus I'd like to see a few more photos.


Lightweight Wire gate's (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.25/5 Average Rating : 4.25/5

In: Gear: Archive

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-09


These are amazingly light (35g!) and very affordable ($5). I have these on the pro/bolt end of all my draws, which they are perfect for (I prefer a bent gate with a smoother action for the rope end). Swap 20 of these into a rack and you will feel the weight difference.


Oval Screw-Link (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.00/5 Average Rating : 4.00/5

In: Gear: Add-On Climbing Gear: Bolts and Hangers

Review 3 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-09


This works ok as a descending ring on a setup where untying is impractical. I would not use regularly for lowering or TR because the opening is so narrow that a 10mm rope rubs on the sides. This would be a much better device if it were about 1cm wider.


Pumori Jacket (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.50/5 Average Rating : 4.50/5

In: Gear: Archive

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-08


Warm, versatile, reasonably compressible, quick drying, and surprisingly water repellant. I've worn this comfortably alone, over a light puffy jacket, and under several different shells. After two years of heavy use, including climbing and canyoneering, it still looks almost new. Improvements would include a layer on the shoulders for pack straps and a few more stitches inside to make the space behind the pocket usable as an additional pocket.


First Need DeluxePortable Purifier Average Rating = 2.50/5 Average Rating : 2.50/5

In: Gear: Archive

Review 3 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-07


This was my first filter. I also bought it when it was much cheaper; I paid around $40 for it. I love the fact that is screws onto a Nalgene bottle. In addition to guaranteeing the purity of your water this is the only way this beast can be considered usable; it is definately a two hand task and the pump action is guaranteed to burn calories. While this seems lighter, it actually weighs more than my 1.5 lb Katadyn pocket filter. At $93 it is no longer the value it once was.


Pocket Filter (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 5.00/5 Average Rating : 5.00/5

In: Gear: Archive

Review 5 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-07


The gold standard for water filtration. Solid, easy to use and easy to maintain. There are lighter filters now, but nothing can touch this classic in the realm of reliability. My only complaint is the price, but for a lifetime of dependable use it's a great value.


Talus 35 Pack - Women's (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.00/5 Average Rating : 4.00/5

In: Gear: Archive

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-07


This pack sets the bar for minimum features on a technical pack. Great suspension, excellent gear access with a full side zipper, solid, easy to use load management, and useful gear loops. This pack will easily hold two helmets, several harnesses, several pairs of shoes, and a full sport rack with room to spare.


Zenith (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 3.54/5 Average Rating : 3.54/5

In: Gear: Essential Equipment: Harnesses: Adjustable

Review 3 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-07


Great harness for the price, I've seen these as cheap as $20. The buckle system doesn't feel as robust as a BD or Petzl and the lack of a rear loop is annoying. I also prefer the easy entry-exit of the BD Bod harness.


Redpoint Express Asymmetrical Runner Average Rating = 3.00/5 Average Rating : 3.00/5

In: Gear: Archive

Review 3 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-07


Light and cheap, good for replacement runners on draws. I picked up several 15 and 20cm units to replace the stubbies that came on my Trango draws. One complaint; I've seen a few of these vary in length up to 3cm which may speak for a lack of consistent quality control.


Redpoint Open Runner Average Rating = 3.50/5 Average Rating : 3.50/5

In: Gear: Archive

Review 3 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-07


Light and cheap, good as long runners or inexpensive gear slings. More convenient than webbing for some anchor setups, including TR. Also great for keeping biners and draws organized in a bag.


Thermal Shirt (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.50/5 Average Rating : 4.50/5

In: Gear: Archive

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-07


Surprisingly durable, warm, moisture wicking, and elastic. The material has a strange, almost plastic feel that takes some getting used to. Ideal for climbing in cold, wet, or windy conditions. The price is unbeatable for a shirt this functional.


Forester (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 5.00/5 Average Rating : 5.00/5

In: Gear: Archive

Review 5 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-07


Simple, functional, durable, and comfortable, this is simply the best pack I have ever used. The hip-belt supports more weight more comfortably than my Kelty or North Face packs. The straps are all extra long simplifying lashing on extra gear. Multiple panels offer great access to the main compartment. The removable hydration pocket holds a 70oz bladder easily and 100oz with a tall load. The waterproof bottom is ideal for setting the pack on snow or mud. The hip belt and shoulder straps are interchangable allowing for a more customized fit, essential for a tall skinny guy like me. This is a very roomy pack which I have comfortably loaded up to 55lbs, though a wider shoulder strap would be better for a load that size.


The Fixe #038 Stainless Steel Hanger (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.67/5 Average Rating : 4.67/5

In: Gear: Add-On Climbing Gear: Bolts and Hangers

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-07


Super-strong highly functional anchor at a supurb price, this is my hanger of chioce. The only time I don't use these is in sensitive areas where color matching is desired.


Ring Anchor Stainless (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.50/5 Average Rating : 4.50/5

In: Gear: Add-On Climbing Gear: Bolts and Hangers

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-07


Very sturdy anchors at a great price. I like to set at least one set of these on any crag for a clean rap-off point.


How to Rock Climb! Average Rating = 4.22/5 Average Rating : 4.22/5

In: Gear: Archive

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-02


You can't learn everything from one source, be it friends, books, or professional instruction. This is a great book to fill in the pieces and to review the basics. The level of detail is surprising for a guide this brief. The writing style is generally easy to understand and the illustrations are usually very clear. This is a MUST READ for beginners and recommended for anyone who climbs, along with Long's Advanced Rock Climbing, Climbing Anchors, and More Climbing Anchors.


Descending Ring (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 3.67/5 Average Rating : 3.67/5

In: Gear: Add-On Climbing Gear: Bolts and Hangers

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-02


Freakishly light and cheap enough to leave behind. I also double up, but two of these still weigh substantially less than a steel ring. I always carry enough of these to keep from rapping on just a sling. I would not recommend these for TR, the aluminum will wear too quickly.


Terra 40 Backpack - 2450cu in (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.00/5 Average Rating : 4.00/5

In: Gear: Hiking and Camping: Backpacks: Backpacking Packs

Review 3 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-02


This was smallest pack I could fit all my gear into. With 100oz of water inside it still holds a 70m rope, harness, shoes, helmet, a dozen draws, a set of nuts and cams, ~50' of webbing and slings, headlamp, first aid, jacket and food. The two sets of gear loops are well placed. The belt strap is comfortable even under heavy load. The pack could be improved with an aluminum stay for support and load-lifter straps. Also, the plastic clip for holding the hydration bladder broke while loading the pack, but the remaining strap is actually better for use with a CamelBak bladder.

March 2006 Update: One of the seams ripped open after less than 6 months of moderate use. I've upgraded to a more robust BD pack and lowered my rating on this from a 4 to a 3.


Capilene MW Crew (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 5.00/5 Average Rating : 5.00/5

In: Gear: Clothing: Men's Clothing: Men's Tops

Review 5 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-05-02


I've comfortably worn this over a wider range of temeratures than any other single piece of clothing I own. I bought this as a base layer for backpacking, but ended up climbing in it in cooler weather. It has held up amazingly well through serious abuse including shimmying up rough sandstone slots and arm-jamming in basalt. Well worth the price (on sale for $28).


Elios Helmet (Manufacturer link) popular Average Rating = 4.33/5 Average Rating : 4.33/5

In: Gear: Essential Equipment: Helmets

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-28


Excellent headpiece for the price. I worry about the cheap-feeling plastic buckles and dial, but they've held up so far. The dial adjustment is great for sizing up for a beanie and is easy even with gloves on. This bucket is surprisingly comfortable and well ventelated. Highly recommended for anyone looking for a great helmet in the $50 range, but try it on first.


H.A.W.G. NV Hydration Pack (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.33/5 Average Rating : 4.33/5

In: Gear: Hiking and Camping: Backpacks: Hydration Packs

Review 3 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-28


I also had a M.U.L.E. before buying the H.A.W.G., which seemed like the perfect pack at the time. After about a year of regular use I've found that when it's full of water it never holds as much gear as I'd like or expect, and when I strap my rope to it the shoulder straps are woefully inadequate under the load. If you're looking for a technical daypack I'd recommend a hydration-ready climbing pack from BD, TNF or Osprey with more room, better suspension and a more durable shell.


Unbottle 100 oz - True Blue/Graphite (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 3.50/5 Average Rating : 3.50/5

In: Gear: Training & Accessories: Water Bottles and Bags

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-27


Leakproof, virtually indestructable, and smaller than a pair of Nalgenes when empty. The snap-on strap clips are surprisingly tough, they've never accidently popped off. I've used this in my BD Bullet pack, TNF daypack, Kelty and REI backpacks and even straped to the back of a Kelty Kids carrier. I went with 100oz over 70 because of negligable weight diff; the 70oz is only slightly smaller empty. This is one of the only ways I would trust this much water in the same bag as my gear.


Koala (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.25/5 Average Rating : 4.25/5

In: Gear: Essential Equipment: Chalk Bags

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-27


Almost perfect, this little bag is light with a wide mouth and functional straps. I don't miss having a pocket, I wouldn't carry my keys (or any other uneccesary weight) in my chalk bag anyway. My only complaint is lack of a flat bottom to keep it standing on the ground.


Quicksilver Carabiner - Bent (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.33/5 Average Rating : 4.33/5

In: Gear: Essential Equipment: Carabiners: Non-Locking Carabiners: Bent Gates

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-27


Excellent biner for the price. I bought these because they were the cheapest, but I've been very happy with them. The action is very smooth and the weight isn't bad. I swapped them out for the wiregates on one side of all my lightweight Trango draws.


PreCip Jacket (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 3.50/5 Average Rating : 3.50/5

In: Gear: Clothing: Men's Clothing: Men's Outerwear: Men's Hard Shells

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-19


Excellent for what it's made for and an amazing jacket considering both the weight and price; I got mine for under $50. The waterproofing has held up better than my 3-layer Gore-Tex and it breathes better as well. I keep this in the bottom of my bag anytime there's a chance of rain. Not tough enough for mountaineering but better than any lightweight wind or rain gear I've used.


Flash Velcro Climbing Slipper (Manufacturer link) popular Average Rating = 4.04/5 Average Rating : 4.04/5

In: Gear: Shoes: Climbing Shoes: Velcro

Review 5 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-17


This is the third shoe I've climbed in regularly, and far and away the best I've ever used. I went with the smallest I could squeeze into, only a half size down from street. They HURT for weeks of regular use but stretched nicely and now fit like an oiled glove. Velcro is such a happy medium, I prefer some adjustability over a slipper. The right toe wore a little fast from sloppy smearing on rough granite (with good form they wear well). Even with one rounded toe they still edge beautifilly. After six months of weekend use they are nowhere near needing a resole. Highly recommended; the combination of strength, stickyness and sensitivity still blows me away.


Quicksilver Screwgate Locking Carabiner (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.21/5 Average Rating : 4.21/5

In: Gear: Essential Equipment: Carabiners: Locking Carabiners

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-11


Favorite all-around locker. Excellent weight, opening, and price. Smooth action and functional lock. I have 4, upgraded from a set of OP ISO Ds for the weight and opening. For belay I prefer the OP Jake, but these open wide enough to do the job when traveling light. Excellent for TR and anchor setups; at 56g these are light enough to use on draws for insecure placements.


Isopro Canister Fuel 8oz (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.00/5 Average Rating : 4.00/5

In: Gear: Hiking and Camping: Stoves: Fuel and Accessories

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-09


Light, convenient, and better at altitude than off-brand fuel I've tried. Our local Army Surpluss store carries these relatively cheap. I've gotten 8-10 quart boils with my Pocket Rocket on a 4 oz can.


PackTowl Original (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.00/5 Average Rating : 4.00/5

In: Gear: Hiking and Camping: More Stuff: Camping Accessories

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-09


I bought a large one on sale and cut it into three decent size pack towels. After just one wash they become very soft and much nicer to use. Even after many, many washings they still work as advertized. It's easily worth the weight to keep a small section with your gear to dry stuff off; I've cleaned up a goodly amount of spring mud with just a 6 inch strip.


HDPE, Multi, Screw Caps, Dispensing Caps (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 3.00/5 Average Rating : 3.00/5

In: Gear: Archive

Review 3 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-09


The four thick bottles are great for anything you'd carry in small quantity; cooking oil, toiletries, a bit o' nip, etc. The square shapes are great for packing. The jars are fine for asprin or dillweed. However, the other bottles are flimsy and I've never used the dispenser caps. I would just pick up the bottles you need somewhere like REI rather than get a set.


Pacific ISO Cold Forged Doval Carabiner (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.23/5 Average Rating : 4.23/5

In: Gear: Essential Equipment: Carabiners: Non-Locking Carabiners: Wire Biners

Review 3 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-09


Light, strong, inexpensive, with color that holds well. The "D" part of "Doval" design makes sense, but why make the outside "oval?" That just allows it to flip more easily handicapping what would otherwise be a near-perfect racking biner. I finally put all mine on sport draws where they can't rotate.


Rino 120 (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 3.33/5 Average Rating : 3.33/5

In: Gear: Archive

Review 3 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-07


I love my Rino. I use both the GPS and FRS radio. The sub-channels are the same as on my Motorola FRS radios. Use of GMRS channels requires a $75 FCC licence. The killer app on this device is the ability to broadcast and receive positions among other Rino units (with names and "buddy icons"). The biggest drawback is when you kill your GPS batteries you have no radio. If I were to do it again now I would buy the smallest, lightest GPS and FRS radios I could find to carry less weight and use separate batteries.


32oz Wide Mouth Bottle (Manufacturer link) popular Average Rating = 4.34/5 Average Rating : 4.34/5

In: Gear: Training & Accessories: Water Bottles and Bags

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-07


I have at least 10 of these bottles, some of them over 10 years old. I've used them for everything from powdered GatorAide to Milk and they've always washed clean, no odor (I don't let them sit and stew for weeks before cleaning). I've never broken a Lexan Nalgene bottle or lid loop (I broke an old white one dropping it full and frozen). I've carried them climbing, full of water, hanging on a biner. I prefer a Camelback for longer hikes and routes, but a solid bottle is perfect for sport and bouldering. At $4-6 on sale, these fall into the category of "essential." March 2006 Update: I've now had three of these crack and devalop leaks on the bottom or sides. One was very old, but 2 of them less than 2 years old. That's a 30% failure rate under moderate use.


1-inch Tubular Webbing popular Average Rating = 5.00/5 Average Rating : 5.00/5

In: Gear: Add-On Climbing Gear: Webbing

Review 5 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-07


Cheap, convenient, amazingly strong, and the core shows through when the sheath is damaged. I always carry at least a half dozen lengths from 5 to 40 feet. Stitched runners are great, but you can't beat the price of webbing. Webbing can (usually) be untied and tied around anchors or tied together for length. Essential for toproping and canyoneering, and useful for extra runners, this is a must have.


Forearm Trainer Average Rating = 3.25/5 Average Rating : 3.25/5

In: Gear: Training & Accessories: Training

Review 3 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-07


I bought this because it was cheap. I keep it in my car and hit it up 2-3 times a day on the commute. It's still holding up well after 6 months of temperature fluctuation in the car (works great with gloves). I like it because you get more variety than with a ball and more focus on the two middle fingers than with a spring grip. Makes your hands smell like rubber.


ATC Belay/Rappel Device (Manufacturer link) popular Average Rating = 4.31/5 Average Rating : 4.31/5

In: Gear: Essential Equipment: Belay Devices & Descenders

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-05


Simple, light, functional, found everywhere, and can be had for cheap. Easier to load and smoother than many newer, more speacialized, models (Like the XP). However, it's very difficult to get adequate friction on an 8mm rope.


Flow Stone Screw-On Modulars 2-Pack (Manufacturer link) Average Rating = 4.00/5 Average Rating : 4.00/5

In: Gear: Archive

Review 4 out of 5 stars

Review by: mgoodro, 2005-04-05


Four of these came in my Metolius box. They are some of the most natural feeling, and most challenging, holds on my wall. As good as they are, in this case I wish they were bolt-on so I could reconfigure more easily.

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