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Comments by ThailandClimb (7)


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Top Points :)

Bonus question: Can you guess the route?

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There are definitely a few chimneys at the crag made a little spicy without a helmet. This climb however is very well bolted so fortunately any tumble shouldn't be accompanied by pin balling back down the chimney. However, as most sport, if not all, climbers on holiday rarely find space in a pack for a helmet; our local rock shop (CMRCA) will lend anyone a helmet who drops in.

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Sorry, slightly miscommunication i think. I'm not saying you shouldn't get any cool or interesting moves on 5.10's, one of my favorite climbs of all time is a 5.7. What I was saying is it's unusual to find them 'this' cool. Which of course, is a relatively subjective term. It's a technical and really committing, but quite easy if you just go for it :)

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1 star, you critic eh? :)

The tufa/stalactite drops away into a roof beneath his back foot, in this picture he's mid-high step as it's a traversing/mantle kind of move.

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Don't be such cynic :o) Kat is one of the best climbers out here, she has helped to develop in a really positive way what climbing means in Thailand. Plus she earned a silver medal representing the Thai National Team in the Asian games....I thought the photo was quite a good one as well :o)


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It was originally named by local Thai climber Kraisak (Tom) Boonthip, who named the crag 'Crazy Hot'. However, when he was showing a visiting American climber Josh around (who now develops the crag with CMRCA) he misheard Tom and thought he said "Crazy Horse" because the outcrop on top of the crag is shaped like a horse. The both decided that actually Crazy Horse was a better name, and the crag was born.

See the links for a picture of the horse's head (its quite defined) - http://www.rockclimbing.com/photos/Topo/Horses_Head_69931.html

http://www.rockclimbing.com/photos/Sport/Baby_Rock_115898.html

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Also the first 60 feet of the climb would be totally unprotected :)

The vast majority of Thai (and most of Asia's) rock is limestone karst formations. These very rarely have crack systems. They might have one or two, but it's extremely rare to be able to link enough of these to protect a route. Meaning nearly every route would be X R.

Because of this sport climbing has become the dominant style of climbing throughout Asia (or DWS). However, safety aside it's also the local ethic. When you also consider the cost of a trad rack, to impose a western set of ethics on Thai climbing would essentially disallow a huge proportion of local climbers to climb. As the gear is so expensive, even more so than the states.

...or create a nation of free-solo rock stars :P